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  • Since we want the best for our pets, we should include them in the go green movement. Here are a few ways you can create a cleaner, greener home for you and your pet.

  • An unplanned weight loss of more than 10% of a dog’s body weight is considered abnormal. Weight loss occurs because calories absorbed from the diet do not meet the calories being used by the body. This can occur due to many factors including excessive cold or physical activity, disease states that heighten the metabolic rate, insufficient calories or poor diet, inability to ingest the diet, inability to digest and/or absorb the nutrients in the diet, and loss of nutrients from vomiting, diarrhea, or polyuria. As well as a thorough history and physical exam, testing such as bloodwork, urinalysis, and imaging may be needed to determine the underlying cause in order to institute targeted treatment.

  • The simple description of an abscess is a pocket of pus located somewhere in the body.

  • Acepromazine is a sedative/tranquilizer used primarily in cats and dogs as a pre-medication for anesthesia or for chemical restraint. It is given by injection in the clinic or by mouth in the form of a tablet. The most common side effect is low blood pressure. Acepromazine should not be used in conjunction with certain toxicities, or in pets with heart disease, low blood pressure. It should be used cautiously in pets with mild liver or heart disease, clotting problems, or in pregnant, debilitated, or young animals. If a negative reaction occurs, call your veterinary office.

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Paracetamol, APAP, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) is a pain relief and fever-reducing medicine people use for many types of pain.

  • Acetaminophen is a medication that is used to treat fever and/or pain in humans. Acetaminophen is toxic for dogs, and unfortunately, acetaminophen toxicity in dogs is somewhat common as dog owners attempt to treat their dogs for pain without first consulting with a veterinarian.

  • Acetazolamide is a diuretic used off label and given by mouth to treat glaucoma or alkalosis. The most common side effect is stomach upset, but other side effects of the central nervous system, blood, kidneys, electrolytes, blood sugar levels, liver, or skin are possible. Do not use this medication in pets with liver or kidney disease, or low sodium or potassium blood levels. Use with caution in pets with acidosis, diabetes, pregnancy or lactation. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Canine acne is an inflammatory disorder of the lips and the skin of the muzzle. Dogs with mild cases of acne often have red bumps or pustules (pimples) on their skin. In some cases, acne may be associated with underlying skin conditions. There are a variety of treatments that may be used for the treatment of canine acne.

  • New medical advancements are extraordinary, yet many veterinarians are turning to a form of ancient medicine to help their patients. Utilizing centuries-old techniques of acupuncture and acupressure may enhance traditional veterinary medicine and further benefit the canine community.

  • Acute caudal myopathy results from overuse of the tail, causing a strain or sprain of the muscle groups used for tail wagging. Possible scenarios leading to limber tail include hard/vigorous play within the previous 24 hours, prolonged swimming, or active hunting within the past few days. The tail may droop limply between your dog's rear legs, or it may stick straight out behind him for a short distance before drooping. Uncomplicated acute caudal myopathy is treated with rest and anti-inflammatory medication.

About Us

16th Avenue Animal Hospital is a recently opened veterinary clinic in Markham area. The Hospital is Managed by Dr Fareed Ahmad.

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Location Hours
Monday9:00am – 7:00pm
Tuesday9:00am – 7:00pm
Wednesday9:00am – 7:00pm
Thursday9:00am – 7:00pm
Friday9:00am – 7:00pm
Saturday10:00am – 5:00pm
Sunday10:00am – 5:00pm

On call for emergencies.